Unto Us a Son is Given

by Roger Severino

AsonisGivenThe Bible tells us that “when the time came to completion, God sent His Son, born of a woman, born under the law, to redeem those under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.”[1] The implication, among other things, is that Jesus was not born in a random time and place. His arrival was the climax of a story that stretched all the way back to creation, through Abraham, through David, and a host of other characters. In Jesus’ genealogy, Matthew is careful to point out that Jesus is the son of Abraham and the son of David (see Matthew 1:1).

  1. Son of Abraham. When the Lord calls Abraham to a new land, He promises in Genesis 12 to make from him a great nation and that through his lineage “all the families of the earth shall be blessed.” How are all the nations blessed through Abraham and his lineage? Paul helps to clarify this in Galatians 3: “Know then that it is those of faith who are the sons of Abraham. And the Scripture, foreseeing that God would justify the Gentiles by faith, preached the gospel beforehand to Abraham, saying, ‘In you shall all the nations be blessed.’ So then, those who are of faith are blessed along with Abraham, the man of faith.” [2] And a bit later: “so that in Christ Jesus the blessing of Abraham might come to the Gentiles, so that we might receive the promised Spirit through faith.”[3] Jesus was the son of Abraham who brought the promised blessings to all people. If you belong to Jesus, then you too are a son of Abraham, because you share in Abraham’s faith in God and His Messiah, the ultimate son of Abraham.
  2. Son of David. In 2 Samuel 7 we find God making a covenant with David, telling him that David’s Kingdom will endure forever. Though some of the things God speaks of are fulfilled in David’s immediate son, Solomon, it is clear in this passage and the remainder of the Old Testament that the people are looking for someone greater than Solomon who would be the Messiah. That is why after Solomon’s death you see prophets, such as Isaiah, who say that someone will reign on David’s throne who is called “Mighty God” and “Everlasting Father” (Isaiah 9:6-7). That is why the New Testament is clear to point out that Jesus is THE Son of David who was to come.
  3. Son of God. Mark begins his Gospel thus: “The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.”[4] In Luke’s birth narrative, the angel tells Mary that the Holy One to be born will be called the Son of God (Luke 1:35). Towards the end of his Gospel, John tells us: “Jesus performed many other signs in the presence of His disciples that are not written in this book. But these are written so that you may believe Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and by believing you may have life in His name.”[5] Yes, Jesus is the son of Abraham and the son of David. This Christmas, however, we celebrate and worship Him as the incarnate Son of God.

[1] The Holy Bible: Holman Christian Standard Version. (Nashville: Holman Bible Publishers, 2009), Ga 4:4–5.
[2] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version (Wheaton: Standard Bible Society, 2001), Ga 3:7–9.
[3] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version (Wheaton: Standard Bible Society, 2001), Ga 3:14.
[4] The Holy Bible: Holman Christian Standard Version. (Nashville: Holman Bible Publishers, 2009), Mk 1:1.
[5] The Holy Bible: Holman Christian Standard Version. (Nashville: Holman Bible Publishers, 2009), Jn 20:30–31.

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